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  • Learn how to ride it and work on your balance, at this point you should also learn the opposite stance, it will make things much easier to learn once you get into some of the more technical tricks.
  • Decide what moves you want to/need to learn and imagine how to make them work together, what makes them different and what makes them similar. It gives you a basic insight into the mechanics. So naturally, you should start with an ollie.
  • At this point, figure out the principles behind it. How does it work? Where and why are your feet supposed to do this and not that.
  • When you finally decide to give it a shot, don't think about what you need to do in a "step" fashion. Your both legs have to work as one, kinda like a solid sidekick - you have to be fully aware of both of your legs and your hips at the same time to create one singular motion. Otherwise, it will always "almost" work.
  • Once you can sort of do it, now it's the time to break it up into pieces and master every component. At some point, it will become almost like a form of "leg memory". Now look for a trick that is preferably a direct extension or variation of your previously learnt trick. After you learn how to ollie, you can either go for nollie, to balance your stances. If not, give kickflip a shot. Let's say you already know how to do a kickflip - try a heelflip or a shove it. Now that you know how to do a kickflip and a shove it - see what happens when you combine them both.
  • Great. Now you're addicted. Good luck and wear a helmet, seriously.

In one sentence - practice, be patient because it takes time, understand what you're doing and why you're doing what you're doing, also, I can't stress it enough - focus.

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